How to fund a home renovation

Financing a home renovation or extension can be a challenge.

Most people save up for weeks or even months to get enough money for a single renovation. So you may be wondering how you could realistically fund your project. In this article, we’re going to describe a couple of acceptable ways to fund a home renovation.

 

Use your savings

Once you start putting money into your savings, it can add up quickly. Instead of letting your money just sit in a bank account ‘for a rainy day’, use it.

Renovations can be expensive which is why people tend to save up a lot of money just to pay for them.

To help remedy this, your savings account could pay for the entire job. Or you could put some funds towards the renovation to offset the costs that you have to pay from your own ages and salary.

The point of a savings account is to have money for when you need it. If your renovation counts as a needed improvement, there’s no shame in breaking out the piggy bank.

 

Take out a loan

There aren’t many situations where it’s acceptable to take out a loan for the sake of a renovation.

However, if you require an urgent renovation then it does warrant the need for emergency funds. In this case, it’s perfectly acceptable to take out a loan (assuming you can pay for it before the interest piles on) for the sake of a home renovation.

If you’re dealing with bad credit history, you can take out adverse credit loans to help you pay for the renovation. In short, only consider taking out a loan if you need to fix something urgently.

Don’t rely on loans as a means to pay for a renovation that you want for the sake of luxury.

 

Doing it yourself

Although this isn’t a way to fund a home renovation, it’s a much cheaper way to get the job done. You don’t need to spend money on professional services all the time. Occasionally, you require someone with experience. It’s absolutely recommended to use a professional for some aspects like wiring or electric. But you can save a lot of money if done correctly.

If you want to save money and learn how to repair and maintain different parts of your home, then DIY training is perhaps the easiest way to do so.

You learn from your mistakes more than a book, so hands-on experience is always appreciated. As long as you have someone supervising or at least monitoring what you’re doing, you’ll find that it’s incredibly easy to get DIY work done as long as you put your mind to it.

 

Out of all the methods you might have to fund a home renovation, these three are arguably the most common and should be used when possible.

Tools to Home Make DIY Easier

For a lot of people, DIY isn’t a passion which fills them with joy and satisfaction, but you can make DIY easier.

Instead, this sort of work is done out of necessity, as you want to save money around your home. But it isn’t always easy.

In a lot of cases, barriers will be presented to you, and you won’t have a way to overcome them. To help you out with this, this post will be exploring some of the best tools out there to make DIY easier.

 

  • Cutting

 

One of the hardest jobs a novice DIYer will have to undertake is cutting. Unlike paper or other thin materials, wood and metal aren’t a simple matter of using scissors. Instead, you will need a saw, but you have to choose the right one.

For most jobs, a mitre saw will be enough to make all of the cuts you need. Along with this, you should also consider the idea of a cheap circular saw to help you out, too.

 

  • Measuring

 

Before you can make a cut, it’s always good to make sure that you’ve measured it twice. However, with all the modern tools on the market, you don’t really need to go to this effort.

Laser measuring tools have become very reliable over the last few years and make DIY easier. Offering unparalleled accuracy, this sort of tool is perfect for anyone who struggles to measure the right lines.

 

  • Joining

 

Once you’ve measured and made the cuts of the material you need, it’s time to start putting things together. For wood, one of the best ways to do this is using a nail gun. This sort of tool is perfectly safe if you use it correctly. You have to be careful, though. This sort of tool can often damage softer woods. Along with this, nails aren’t always the most attractive option, anyway.

To solve this issue, glue is here to save the day, and you have loads of examples to choose from. Spray adhesives have come a long way over the last few years, with a lot of companies offering options which can dry within minutes, giving you years of strong hold. We put brackets on our mantelpiece to hold our oak beam, but then glued the beam to the wall. Worked perfectly and saved using any nails to mount it!

This sort of material won’t always be appropriate for the job you’re doing. So, it’s always worth doing some research to make sure you’re getting the right glue for your project.

 

  • Painting

 

Finally, it’s time to think about one of the biggest jobs a DIYer will ever have to do; painting.

In a lot of cases, this work will take up a huge amount of your project time, and can be very hard to get right. To help you with this, there are loads of modern paint systems out there which take this work out of your hands. They dispense the paint for you at an even rate; it’s never been easier to give your walls a perfect coat.

 

Hopefully, this post will inspire you to start taking on some bigger projects, while also making them a lot easier for yourself. A lot of people will be daunted by a job they think they can’t do. Make DIY easier by finding some kind of tool to help you, and it doesn’t have to cost a fortune.

 



Creating a Home Extension Fit for Work, Rest and Play

Whether you’ve started to grow your family or you’re simply outgrowing the space you’re in, creating a home extension could help you avoid the stress of moving.

But how do you make sure the space you create is fit for all that’s asked of it? And just where should you put those extra feet and inches? If you’re struggling to find a quiet spot to do your daily yoga, need a nook for all the kids’ toys or an office space to call your own, these are the points you can’t gloss over when creating a home extension fit for work, rest and play…

 

What, where, how?

Sometimes it’s really obvious where you should put new walls. Other times, your options aren’t quite so clear cut! For the most part, extending over existing structures, such as adding a bedroom over a garage, tends to be the most fuss-free option.

Check your foundations

You’ll need to check the strength of your foundations to make sure the room below can take the weight and also apply for planning permission to cover any increase in height or change in roof pitch, but it can be a very cost effective way to add space. If your home is in a high demand area you could also add a substantial amount on to the value of your home, particularly if you add a bedroom.

If you do have a garage and you don’t use it for car or other storage, converting it into an extra room might be another savvy way to get some additional room without too much expense. Unless you live on a new build estate, you shouldn’t need planning permission to carry out this kind of conversion. However, if you decide to build beyond the existing walls of the garage, an application is required.

Location

Before you start shifting your motor and moving your sofa, think about the logistics of not having a garage and how it might impact you in the future. If you’re a car owner, do you have another safe and permanent spot to park your car? And, if you were to sell your home in the future, could having no garage potentially hold back a sale? To cover all bases, you could ask your architect to plan a conversion that can easily be reversed if necessary.

Finally, if you’d like a totally brand new area to completely transform your home, choosing where to locate it is all about where you can afford to sacrifice outdoor space without intruding on neighbours’ boundaries. You’ll find some great tips for staying neighbourly and avoiding disputes in this article.

When you’re extending past the walls of your current home, you will need to apply for planning permission and of course, consider how your new layout will work. Will you need to go through one room to get to another and if so, will it disturb the general use and purpose of the space in question?

Layout can be even more important than size and space. If you get the layout wrong, your extension may not get the use it deserves.

 

Let there be light…and warmth too!

Once you’ve thought about how and where you’ll grow your home, it’s time to move onto the finer details. The level of electrical work you’ll require will depend how near your extra feet and inches are to existing wiring and if you’re planning to run heating or just lighting into the room.

If you’re creating a home extension downstairs or converting a garage, bi-fold doors can make a sensible addition to your plans. Choose something energy efficient with floor to ceiling panes like these from Vufold. You’ll have the bonus of lots of light when needed along with an attractive and convenient route to your outside space.

Your choice of doors and windows will impact any heating requirements too. You may want to match the style of those elsewhere in your home. Energy efficiency should also be a checkpoint on your list. Especially if your extension isn’t sheltered by other areas of the building.

For more compact spaces where you don’t want to sacrifice floor and wall space to radiators, underfloor heating can be a worthwhile, though not inexpensive, investment.

 

Hopefully this post has given you a few pointers for creating a home extension. If you’ve already completed your extension of dreams, maybe you could enter your efforts into the don’t move improve awards?

Tools You Need if You’re Doing a House Renovation

Home restoration can be a cruel little demon, so I’ve taken the time to list the tools you need if you’re doing a house renovation, to make things that little bit easier.

Whether it’s a big project, or a smaller, easier project such as putting up some shelves and re-painting, these tools will really come in handy!

Voltage detector pen
These tools are very simple but very effective. I can’t even count the number of times me and Jay nearly touched a live wire that was hanging out the ceiling. When you put the end of the pen against the end of a wire, it flashes red to say that the wire is live, and you need to turn the electrics off. Saved us probably about 3/4 electric shocks. Well worth the money!

 

 

A drill
We used a drill for all sorts: building a stud wall, attaching the skirting, creating a shelf at the top end of the bath, bring floorboards up, fixing floorboards back down.

Scraper
Another simple tool that has LOADS of uses. Not only was it good for stripping wallpaper, but also for smoothing caulk into crevices, for mixing cement/paint in buckets. Even for removing ridges in the windowsills before painting them.

tools you need if you're doing a house renovation

Mitre Saw
This is a bit of a weird one, and not something that most people would have just sitting in their garage, but this tool was invaluable to us. We used it to cut down our wooden flooring and our skirting boards. It cuts things with absolute precision and doesn’t splinter the wood too much.

tools you need if you're doing a house renovation

In some cases, these tools could help you avoid house renovation disasters. They might even save your life one day and so are well worth the investment, especially if you’re doing the work yourself rather than hiring tradesmen. Those are my top tools you need if you’re doing a house renovation.

What would you say are the tools you need if you’re doing a house renovation? Are there any you think I should add to the list? Let me know in the comments!

 

How to avoid house renovation disasters

Our house renovation did not always go to plan, so here are some tips on how to avoid house renovation disasters. Hopefully, I can help a few people out, and they can avoid making the same mistakes that we did.

Making a stud wall

We ‘found’ an old doorway that had clearly been boarded up a few years ago. Our house must have originally had a hallway, and this would have been the door that ran from the back of the hall into the kitchen. It had been boarded up with chipboard which couldn’t be plastered over.

This set us back a couple of weeks as Jay had to make a stud wall himself, which he had never done before. It would have been fluke to get it right first time, so it had to come down and be built again. Luckily, Jay had learnt from his mistake and got it perfect the second time, using the right tools

The floor had to be levelled twice

With a house, know that nothing is going to be straight. Literally, none of our walls are straight, and our floors weren’t level enough for the wooden flooring in the kitchen. It also didn’t help that cement had been used to glue the tiles to the floor.

When Jay was lifting them up, a huge metre-wide chunk of concrete came up with the tiles. This had to be filled in with concrete, and then the floor was properly levelled.

But even after one ‘go’ of levelling it wasn’t level, so we had to do it again.

avoid house renovation disasters for mess

Photo by Nolan Issac on Unsplash

Some of the plastering had to be redone

Thanks to our wonky walls, the plastering was done twice to try and level them out. Some walls were fine to be left, but our chimney breast was visibly out of line. It was re-plastered to bring it straight with the other side.

This doesn’t sound like a big job, but it meant we had to wait another week for it to dry before we could emulsion the walls.

Some of our skirting didn’t even touch parts of the wall, because it was so out of line, so we had to fill this in afterwards with caulk.

The radiators went on before the skirting board

This is a logistics problem that no one thought through. It wasn’t too much of a problem. It just meant me and Jay were on our hands and knees with a laser level. We had to get the skirting cut straight and then nailed on correctly.

Top tip to avoid house renovation disasters: try and paint the skirting before it goes on the walls. If you have a workbench, balance the skirting on it and prime and gloss it. It might take a couple of days, but when the skirting is on the wall, it’s difficult to paint it accurately whilst crawling on the floor. I did get some on the freshly-painted walls (ssh, don’t tell Jay).

Always leave a toilet in when renovating the bathroom

Even if you have to plumb it in again at the end of every day, it’s crucial that you leave the toilet in. I had to use my neighbours’ for around 8 weeks. Luckily, we weren’t living there full time, and Jay often used my flower beds instead (thanks).

Photo by Paco S on Unsplash

Keep every single receipt

The amount of money we have probably wasted because we wanted to take something back, that we didn’t use, is probably ridiculous.

Luckily, places such as Wickes have a six-month return policy, so you still have time to find that receipt even four months later.

If you’re lazy, it’s best to stockpile things that need to go back, so you can do it in one trip.

I hope these tips on how to avoid house renovation disasters helps you somewhat! Really think about the order of things logically to avoid making things more difficult for yourself. You wouldn’t put the flooring in and then paint the ceiling!

Any other tips you’d add? Let me know in the comments.