How to fund a home renovation

Financing a home renovation or extension can be a challenge.

Most people save up for weeks or even months to get enough money for a single renovation. So you may be wondering how you could realistically fund your project. In this article, we’re going to describe a couple of acceptable ways to fund a home renovation.

 

Use your savings

Once you start putting money into your savings, it can add up quickly. Instead of letting your money just sit in a bank account ‘for a rainy day’, use it.

Renovations can be expensive which is why people tend to save up a lot of money just to pay for them.

To help remedy this, your savings account could pay for the entire job. Or you could put some funds towards the renovation to offset the costs that you have to pay from your own ages and salary.

The point of a savings account is to have money for when you need it. If your renovation counts as a needed improvement, there’s no shame in breaking out the piggy bank.

 

Take out a loan

There aren’t many situations where it’s acceptable to take out a loan for the sake of a renovation.

However, if you require an urgent renovation then it does warrant the need for emergency funds. In this case, it’s perfectly acceptable to take out a loan (assuming you can pay for it before the interest piles on) for the sake of a home renovation.

If you’re dealing with bad credit history, you can take out adverse credit loans to help you pay for the renovation. In short, only consider taking out a loan if you need to fix something urgently.

Don’t rely on loans as a means to pay for a renovation that you want for the sake of luxury.

 

Doing it yourself

Although this isn’t a way to fund a home renovation, it’s a much cheaper way to get the job done. You don’t need to spend money on professional services all the time. Occasionally, you require someone with experience. It’s absolutely recommended to use a professional for some aspects like wiring or electric. But you can save a lot of money if done correctly.

If you want to save money and learn how to repair and maintain different parts of your home, then DIY training is perhaps the easiest way to do so.

You learn from your mistakes more than a book, so hands-on experience is always appreciated. As long as you have someone supervising or at least monitoring what you’re doing, you’ll find that it’s incredibly easy to get DIY work done as long as you put your mind to it.

 

Out of all the methods you might have to fund a home renovation, these three are arguably the most common and should be used when possible.

Tools to Home Make DIY Easier

For a lot of people, DIY isn’t a passion which fills them with joy and satisfaction, but you can make DIY easier.

Instead, this sort of work is done out of necessity, as you want to save money around your home. But it isn’t always easy.

In a lot of cases, barriers will be presented to you, and you won’t have a way to overcome them. To help you out with this, this post will be exploring some of the best tools out there to make DIY easier.

 

  • Cutting

 

One of the hardest jobs a novice DIYer will have to undertake is cutting. Unlike paper or other thin materials, wood and metal aren’t a simple matter of using scissors. Instead, you will need a saw, but you have to choose the right one.

For most jobs, a mitre saw will be enough to make all of the cuts you need. Along with this, you should also consider the idea of a cheap circular saw to help you out, too.

 

  • Measuring

 

Before you can make a cut, it’s always good to make sure that you’ve measured it twice. However, with all the modern tools on the market, you don’t really need to go to this effort.

Laser measuring tools have become very reliable over the last few years and make DIY easier. Offering unparalleled accuracy, this sort of tool is perfect for anyone who struggles to measure the right lines.

 

  • Joining

 

Once you’ve measured and made the cuts of the material you need, it’s time to start putting things together. For wood, one of the best ways to do this is using a nail gun. This sort of tool is perfectly safe if you use it correctly. You have to be careful, though. This sort of tool can often damage softer woods. Along with this, nails aren’t always the most attractive option, anyway.

To solve this issue, glue is here to save the day, and you have loads of examples to choose from. Spray adhesives have come a long way over the last few years, with a lot of companies offering options which can dry within minutes, giving you years of strong hold. We put brackets on our mantelpiece to hold our oak beam, but then glued the beam to the wall. Worked perfectly and saved using any nails to mount it!

This sort of material won’t always be appropriate for the job you’re doing. So, it’s always worth doing some research to make sure you’re getting the right glue for your project.

 

  • Painting

 

Finally, it’s time to think about one of the biggest jobs a DIYer will ever have to do; painting.

In a lot of cases, this work will take up a huge amount of your project time, and can be very hard to get right. To help you with this, there are loads of modern paint systems out there which take this work out of your hands. They dispense the paint for you at an even rate; it’s never been easier to give your walls a perfect coat.

 

Hopefully, this post will inspire you to start taking on some bigger projects, while also making them a lot easier for yourself. A lot of people will be daunted by a job they think they can’t do. Make DIY easier by finding some kind of tool to help you, and it doesn’t have to cost a fortune.

 



We’ve Moved In!

The day has finally come, and we’ve moved in to our new house.

I’m sharing some pictures with you, even though it’s still very messy, and we still have a LOT of sorting out to do because WE’VE MOVED IN. I can’t believe how instantly at home me and Jay felt: I thought it would be weird, and wouldn’t feel like our house, but we settled in so quickly.

I suppose that’s because we’ve been doing work on it for six months. Being here every day for that amount of time has obviously got us used to the place.

Our first night here was on Saturday. I don’t think either of us slept particularly well on a new mattress, and in a new place. The water tank makes an unusual ticking noise (and it’s in our bedroom) and the road is quite noisy in the mornings. I’ve always lived in a cul-de-sac, so I’m not used to the sound of cars whizzing by in the morning.

We have scrubbed the whole place, I’ve been hoovering every day, and we always have a number of visitors every afternoon. They’re all excited to see it after all the work and money we’ve put in.

So, onto the pictures!

This is right by the front door. As you come in, the stairs are in front of you, and the sideboard is to the right.

living room with sofa and lighting

This is the lounge. The front door is behind the sofa, as is the sideboard above.

You go through the lounge into the kitchen diner. The whole of downstairs is open plan, with only an archway separating the dining room and living room.

moved in to our house

As you might have guessed, by the green carpet, we haven’t touched the two big bedrooms upstairs. And the bed/bedding is going ASAP too.

The small bedroom is being turned into my office. It currently has the same floor as the kitchen, but no wallpaper/paint.

 

It still needs a lot of work. The next job is to dig a trench for drainage that means we can put a washing machine in the garage. We’d also like to tackle the outside of the house before we start on the bedrooms.

At the moment we can only get one car on the drive because of the plants. It would be good to flatten the whole thing, and then get two cars on. At least we’re moved in though!